Book Reviews

Showing 373–384 of 468 results

  • The Outsider – Stephen King

    0 out of 5
    R295.00

    Old-school horror and another masterpiece from King: The brutal (and frankly, difficult to process) murder of an 11-year-old boy and the evidence points conclusively to a Little League coach, English teacher and father Terry Maitland.

  • The Pearl Sister – Lucinda Riley

    0 out of 5
    R285.00

    Christmas Choice 2017

    CeCe D’Apliese has never felt she fitted in anywhere. Following the death of her father, the elusive billionaire Pa Salt – so-called by the six daughters he adopted from around the globe and named after the Seven Sisters star cluster – she finds herself at breaking point. Dropping out of art college, CeCe watches as Star, her beloved sister, distances herself to follow her new love, leaving her completely alone. In desperation, she decides to flee England and discover her past; the only clues she has are a black-and-white photograph and the name of a woman pioneer who lived in Australia over one hundred years ago.

  • The President Is Missing – James Patterson & Bill Clinton

    0 out of 5
    R249.00

    A very exciting duo for Patterson fans: a thriller written with ex-president Clinton in which the fictional Jonathan Lincoln Duncan bears some resemblance to Clinton in personal detail.

  • The President’s Keepers – Jacques Pauw

    0 out of 5
    R280.00

    Christmas Choice 2017

    Investigative journalist Jacques Pauw exposes the darkest secret at the heart of Jacob Zuma’s compromised government: a cancerous cabal that eliminates the president’s enemies and purges the law-enforcement agencies of good men and women.

  • The Prison Letters of Nelson Mandela – Sahm Venter

    0 out of 5
    R425.00

    The market may be satiated with books on Nelson Mandela, but this is something quite different, and very special indeed. When he was incarcerated in 1962, Mandela had no idea that he would then proceed to spend the next twenty seven years in jail. While in prison he wrote hundreds of letters: to prison authorities; government officials; fellow activists; to Winnie and his children.

  • The Queen of the Tearling – Erika Johansen

    0 out of 5
    R285.00

    The Queen of the Tearling is a debut fantasy novel and the first of a trilogy. (The movie rights of which were snapped up by Warner Bros and due for release later this year). The story is set in what appears to be medieval times, although it is in fact the 24th Century. The Tearling is a decaying society in which technology has been abandoned and books don’t matter. Kelsea Glynn is the reluctant heroine and heir to her deceased mother’s throne. She has been in hiding for her first 18 years and the novel begins with the remnants of her mother’s guard arriving to escort her to claim her throne. The Tearling has been governed by her debauched uncle until she came of age, and he appears to be nothing more than a puppet for the evil Red Queen, sorceress-tyrant of the neighbouring country. The Tearling people are suspicious, cowed and disillusioned and Kelsea has to confront her own fears and discover inner resources as she battles to win their loyalty. This is a fun, escapist and well-imagined story, whose fallible, and often amusing, heroine I warmed to hugely. I’m looking forward to the second book.

  • The Red Address Book – Sofia Lundberg

    0 out of 5
    R305.00

    A book for fans of Fredrik Backman’s A Man Called Ove: Doris is 96-years-old and lives in Stockholm. She looks forward to weekly Skype chats with her grandniece Jenny, in America.

  • The Road to Little Dribbling By Bill Bryson

    0 out of 5
    R330.00

    It is twenty years since Notes from a Small Island, and fifteen years since a Bryson travel book. In The Road to Little Dribbling, Bryson is back journeying in his beloved Britain. But things have changed… Once again, the pleasure of a ‘Bryson book’ is the treat of sharing its author’s perception. He manages to combine intelligent social comment and wry humour in the most captivating way. As he travels, we get to hear the lesser-known stories of small towns, and experience a wealth of quirkiness and unique cultural charm.

  • The Rooster Bar – John Grisham

    0 out of 5
    R315.00

    Christmas Choice 2017

    Mark, Todd, and Zola came to law school to change the world, to make it a better place. But now, as third-year students, these close friends realize they have been duped.

  • The Runaway Woman by Josephine Cox

    0 out of 5
    R270.00

    Those looking in from the outside think Lucy Lovejoy’s life is like any other, but at the centre of her family there is a big empty hole where all the love and warmth should be.
    Over the years, her children have watched while their father chipped away at Lucy’s self-confidence. Now the children are following their own paths, and Lucy has never felt more alone. When tragedy strikes at the heart of the family, it’s a wake-up call for Lucy. Everyone has taken a little piece of her, and she isn’t sure who she is anymore.

    So when Lucy faces a betrayal from those she loves deepest, she knows that it’s time to make a choice. Is she brave enough to find herself again?

  • The Selected Works of T. S. Spivet – Reif Larsen

    0 out of 5
    R145.00

    T.S. Spivet is a genius mapmaker who lives on a ranch in Montana. His father is a silent cowboy and his mother is a scientist who for the last twenty years has been looking for a mythical species of beetle.

  • The Seven Imperfect Rules of Elvira Carr – Frances Maynard

    0 out of 5
    R285.00

    This is a debut, rapidly gaining in popularity, which has been adopted and hand-sold by our  passionate  booksellers. Similar in subject toEleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine (Gail Honeyman),but with its own charm.